The 100 deadliest days refers to the period between Memorial Day and Labor Day. It’s a time when the number of deaths arising from teen driving crashes tends to go up. Pennsylvania residents should know that according to AAA, there were more than 8,300 such deaths during the 100 deadliest days between 2008 and 2018.

Parents can do much to curb this trend, starting with family rules that prohibit any kind of unsafe driving habits. Parents need only look at the results of a recent Traffic Culture Safety Index to find out what those habits are. In that survey, conducted by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, 72% of drivers aged 16 to 18 admitted to some form of negligent driving.

The following were the most common: going 10 miles over the speed limit in a residential area (47%), speeding more than 15 mph over the limit on the freeway (40%), texting while driving (35%), running red lights (32%) and aggressive driving (31%). Drowsy driving and seat belt neglect were also frequently reported. Parents can warn their teens about these in addition to the dangers of impaired driving and distracted driving.

Setting a personal example may be the best line of defense, though, as actions speak louder than words. Parents could also consider supervising their teens’ driving for around 50 hours.

If teens continue to act in negligent or reckless ways, they may be involved in motor vehicle accidents, and even if they should survive, they may cause harm to others. Victims may then be able to pursue a personal injury claim if their injuries were serious enough. With legal advice and guidance, victims may build up a strong case against the defendant and achieve a reasonable settlement that covers all their losses, such as medical expenses and lost wages.