Red-light running is a common traffic violation in Pennsylvania and around the country, and hundreds of people die in resulting accidents every year. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety recorded more than 800 such fatalities in 2016 with more than half the victims being pedestrians, bicyclists and occupants of other vehicles.

Installing cameras at dangerous intersections has long been seen as an effective way to reduce not only red-light running violations but also the crashes that often follow. IIHS data shows that the number of violations are reduced by some 40% and that, in large cities with red-light cameras, there are 17% fewer red-light crash fatalities than in those without such a system.

These cameras have generated controversy over the years, though, due to the bad example of some municipalities. It is well known that a city can generate revenue by installing cameras and then shortening the duration of its yellow lights. A loss of public support has led to a decline in the number of communities using them. From 2012 to 2018, it went from 533 to 421.The IIHS and other road safety organizations have provided a checklist, though, on how to build up public support for cameras. Among other things, the public should have a voice on the advisory committee and during regular reviews of the camera program.

When red-light running causes auto accidents, other road users who are harmed in the collision often incur catastrophic injuries that require expensive medical care. Many of them are unable to return to work for prolonged periods of time, if at all. They might find it advisable to have an experienced attorney handle the filing of a claim with the negligent driver’s insurance carrier and the negotiation of a settlement.