Medical Malpractice Archives | Personal Injury Law Blog
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Medical Malpractice Archives

Improvements in diagnosing diabetes patients

When Pennsylvania residents have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, there are several medical conditions that they may be more susceptible to than the average person. In particular, people with these types of diabetes may end up developing end-stage renal disease or chronic kidney disease. These are serious medical conditions, and diagnosing them in a timely manner is an important part of keeping kidneys functioning properly.

Common problems with diagnosing lupus

Lupus is a disease where the body's immune system attacks a person's tissues, and it is considered to be a chronic inflammatory disease. This disease is frequently misdiagnosed as other conditions, and one reason for this is because there is no definitive test that confirms that a person has lupus. When Pennsylvania doctors determine if patients have lupus, they will look at the symptoms and attempt to rule out other medical conditions.

Skilled workers more prone to errors when interrupted

Highly skilled workers in Pennsylvania and elsewhere are more prone to make mistakes when interrupted than less skilled ones, according to research. A study on the subject, which was published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, was conducted by researchers at Michigan State University and funded by the Office of Naval Research.

Misdiagnosing a brown recluse spider bite

Pennsylvania residents may be interested to learn that there are about 40 different conditions that can be misdiagnosed as a brown recluse spider bite. Because these conditions can include skin cancer, Lyme disease, herpes, diabetic ulcers and even antibiotic-resistant staph infection, getting a proper diagnosis is important.

Women don't go back for mammograms after false positives

Many Pennsylvania women undergo regular mammograms to screen for breast cancer. If a woman receives a false-positive result from a mammogram, she may believe that she has cancer until further tests reveal that she does not. A study has found that the trauma of such a false-positive result may cause many women to skip subsequent mammograms.

Prostate cancer treatment declines as PSA tests become rarer

Fewer men in Pennsylvania and around the country are being treated for prostate cancer as more and more physicians question the merits of a controversial blood test. Prostate-specific antigen testing has been widely used to detect early-stage prostate cancer in men over the age of 50, but critics of the procedure say that it often signals the presence of cancer when there is none. This leads to unnecessary anxiety and invasive treatments that sometimes do more harm than good according to a University of Michigan researcher who studied the Medicare records of more than 67,000 men diagnosed with the disease.

American Cancer Society says cancer death rates are down

Pennsylvania residents may be less likely to die from cancer than they used to be, according to the American Cancer Society. The health organization released a report on Jan. 5 showing evidence that cancer death rates have gone down by 25 percent since 1991. The declining rate has resulted in over 2.1 million fewer cancer deaths.

Symptoms of testicular mesothelioma

Mesothelioma cancer is caused by exposure to asbestos. For most patients in Pennsylvania and across the U.S., the disease develops in the lungs, but it can also occur in the heart, abdomen or testicles. Testicular mesothelioma is rare, with only around 100 known cases. That means it is also frequently misdiagnosed.

Penicillin allergies may be misdiagnosed

A study presented at a meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology revealed that many people in Pennsylvania and around the country may have been misdiagnosed with a penicillin allergy or may have outgrown the allergy since they were diagnosed with it as children. In some cases, people may develop a rash or some other condition when they are given penicillin that is mistakenly identified as an allergic reaction.

Study finds many cases of cellulitis misdiagnosed

According to a study published in JAMA Dermatology, the bacterial skin infection cellulitis is widely misdiagnosed. People in Pennsylvania and throughout the country who are diagnosed with cellulitis may actually have a condition known as pseudocellulitis that is not treatable with antibiotics.